journey of the universe

At the end of June I had the privilege of speaking at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. The…

environmental philosophy in asian traditions of thought

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Announcing a fantastic new resource for environmental philosophy, shortly to be published by SUNY press. There is a great section on China including new essays by scholars working on Daoism and Confucianism.┬áCheck out the publisher’s page here. Table of Contents Preface Introduction Section I: Environmental Philosophy in Indian Traditions of Thought 1. George Alfred James,…

cross-cultural learning and ecological civilization

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Below us the text of a speech I gave at the orientation day for the Queen’s-Fudan semester in Shanghai program. Thank you for inviting me to speak at this orientation event. Each person who participates in this program has their own reasons for being here. For some of you it may be to improve your…

religion, nature and urbanization among china’s ethnic minorities

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In June this year Ian Johnson published a major report in the New York Times on China’s plans to urbanize 250 million citizens over the next decade or so. This drive continues the decades-long story of China’s conversion from an 80 per cent rural society into an 80 per cent urban society, a migration that…

journey of the universe

At the end of June I had the privilege of speaking at the Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. The topic for the week was the film Journey of the Universe, by Brian Swimme and Mary Evelyn Tucker. If you haven’t seen it, you can read all about it on the website at http://www.journeyoftheuniverse.org.

The film narrates the 14 million year epic of cosmic evolution from the big bang through to the present day. The purpose of the conference was to present responses to the film from the perspective of various world religions. Below is my 15 minute presentation on Daoism, Ecology and the Journey of the Universe.

the philosophy of qi in an era of air pollution

A view over the Forbidden City in Beijing

In a recent column in Nature, Qiang Wang argues that responsibility for transforming China’s environment lies with its citizens. He points to several instances in which local protests have successfully prevented new industrial activity, and argues that this heralds the beginning of a new relationship between Chinese citizens, the state and the environment. China is…